The human ruler of 120000 years ago carried virus on his DNA, or endangered modern human health

We have been fighting against all kinds of viruses in our bodies all our lives, but the names of viruses we know are less than one tenth of those on the whole earth. However, some medical experts recently found another new type of virus, which is called Neanderthal virus. It is a kind of virus from ancient primitive people in Europe, also known as “junk” DNA virus.

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Neanderthals

In the movie “crazy primitive man”, we can see that the ancient Neanderthals are such a stupid race. In fact, they are close relatives of the ancestors of modern Europeans. They live in Europe 120000 years ago. Because their fossils were found in the Neanderthal Valley in Germany, they were named Neanderthals. Except for Africans, 1% – 4% of modern people in Eurasia have Neanderthal genes, which are often used as the general name of representative populations in the intermediate stage of human evolution.

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Ancient Neanderthals were the rulers of the earth at that time. They were extremely prosperous and brilliant for a time! But the powerful Neanderthals disappeared from the earth. How did they perish after nearly 100000 years of existence? Is it related to the Neanderthal virus found in them?

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Neanderthal virus

This may destroy the Neanderthal gene, what effect will it have on humans? Like type 2 diabetes, lupus erythematosus, urinary incontinence, depression, and so on, are the banes of Neanderthal genes. So when Oxford University published a news report on November 19, 13, researchers were shocked to find a virus in the DNA of ancient Neanderthals.

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After receiving this information, scientists began to study the Neanderthal virus nonstop, and wanted to further study the virus. The possible relationship between these ancient viruses and modern diseases, and whether they affect the health of modern people. Don’t think it’s just a waste of effort. It’s not like this. It is a potential danger to know that most people in Asia and Europe have Neanderthal genes.

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According to the researchers, these viruses from human ancestors existed in human ancestors as early as 500000 years ago. These ancient viruses are endogenous retroviruses, belonging to hml2 virus (related to cancer and HIV), and about 8% of the endogenous retroviruses are related to human DNA. This kind of virus is the result of long-term evolution and can be inherited. Generally speaking, it is a kind of “junk” DNA!

The article, published in the American journal Nature, pointed out that Nepalese genes lead to modern people suffering from type 2 diabetes, Crohn’s disease, lupus erythematosus, biliary cirrhosis and other autoimmune diseases. In view of the fact that only 1.5% of Neanderthal genes are carried by human beings, this comparison makes the impact of Neanderthal genes on human diseases more significant.

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Why didn’t these “junk” DNA evolve like Darwin’s evolutionary theory of natural selection and survival of the fittest? This is really puzzling. Dr. Robert Belshaw of the University of Plymouth, who led the study, said confidently: “in the next five years, we will be able to determine whether these ancient viruses play a role in modern human diseases, and all the mysteries will be solved.

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